Archive for July, 2011

Movement Research Studies Project Podcast Published: Symposium on Masculinity and Embodied Practice.

“The Bully and the Bitch: Pro Wrestling and Drag as Spectacles for Gendering the Audience.” Presented by John Stoltenberg as part of the Movement Research Studies Project: Symposium on Masculinity and Embodied Practice

Listen to the Podcast here: http://traffic.libsyn.com/movementresearch/John_Stoltenberg-The_Bully_and_the_Bitch_FINAL.mp3

Symposium Envisioned and Moderated by Ben Spatz
July 29, 2010
Medicine Show Theatre

The symposium included several paper presentations, speakers, and performances. This paper is “The Bully and the Bitch: Pro Wrestling and Drag as Spectacles for Gendering the Audience.” and was presented by John Stoltenberg.

Studies Project is an artist-curated series of panel discussions, performances and/or other formats that focus on provocative and timely issues of aesthetics and philosophy in the intersection of dance and social politics, confronting and instigated by the dance and performance community.

To view program of the symposium visit:

http://www.urbanresearchtheater.com/pdf/m&ep_pgm.pdf

Scholar’s Corner: DANCING COMMUNITIES

hamera

Finally, I arrive at a book that is explicitly about dance: Judith Hamera’s Dancing Communities: Performance, Difference and Connection in the Global City (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Although this book does not have quite the coherent structure or unified argument of the previous two, it does accomplish something that I called for in my previous post: It places ballet and Pilates training (among other examples) side by side and examines them each as embodied practices, rather than segregating them on account of dance’s public role as one of the “performing arts” and the status of Pilates as a personal rather than public practice. Read the rest of this entry »

The Week Ahead. July 18-24, 2011.

by-ian-w-douglas

This Week at Movement Research…


Classes and Workshops.

Join us for classes with faculty: Charlie Mosey and Barbara Mahler.

Summer MELT 2011 has begun!
July 11-August 12

Last chance to sign up for Beth Goren’s workshop beginning Monday, July 18th!
You can still register for workshops with: Beth Goren, Luis Lara Malvacias, Barbara Mahler, and Reggie Wilson.

For workshop descriptions and registration information, visit http://www.movementresearch.org/classesworkshops/melt/index.php


Movement Research at the Judson Church and Open Performance are both done for the Spring 2011 season and will resume in the fall of 2011.


Photo Floanne Ankah by Ian Douglas

Dance Footage

Hello!
Below are some links to some wonderful footage. I am sure we have all come across these over the years but I thought I would post them again. I am currently taking a Laban Movement Analysis course so some of these are related. Mixed in are a few other random clips of interest including the work of Martin Puryear who has informed my work. Enjoy!Mary Wigman’s Witch DanceJohn Cage’s “Water Walk” on the show “I’ve got a secret.”Mathilde MonnierMathilde Monnier #2Martin PuryearMartin Puryear footage of work

-Juliana F. May 2011 MR artist in residence

Movement Research Studies Project Podcast Published: Symposium on Masculinity and Embodied Practice.

Excerpts and documentation of Making Men, a series of videos and installations presented by Susan Mar Landau as part of the Movement Research Studies Project: Symposium on Masculinity and Embodied Practice

http://traffic.libsyn.com/movementresearch/Susan_MarLandau_-_Making_Men_FINAL.mp3


Moderated by Ben Spatz
July 29, 2010
Medicine Show Theatre

The symposium included several paper presentations, speakers, and performances. Excerpts and documentation of Making Men, a series of videos and installations was presented by Susan Mar Landau.

Studies Project is an artist-curated series of panel discussions, performances and/or other formats that focus on provocative and timely issues of aesthetics and philosophy in the intersection of dance and social politics, confronting and instigated by the dance and performance community.

To view program from the symposium visit:

http://www.urbanresearchtheater.com/pdf/m&ep_pgm.pdf

Scholar’s Corner: YOGA BODY

singleton

Today’s book is Yoga Body: The Origins of Modern Posture Practice by Mark Singleton (Oxford University Press, 2010). This is one of the first scholarly works on yoga in its modern “postural” form, as distinct from studies of Hindu religions and yoga more broadly conceived. In coining the phrase “modern postural yoga,” Singleton points to the current focus on asanas that dominates discussions of yoga in the United States. He traces the development of this focus to the early twentieth century and shows how the what is now called “yoga” may owe as much to modern European physical culture as it does to ancient Indian religious practice.

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The Week Ahead. July 11-17, 2011.

mahler-by-julie-lemberger

This Week at Movement Research…

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Hello! first July blog post

Hello!
This is my first post as the July MR blogger. I am currently in Milwaukee attending the second summer of my MFA at the University of Wisconsin. I have been writing and thinking a lot about meaning and interpretation in dance so I thought I would share a bit on this blog. Any thoughts or contributions to this dialogue are greatly appreciated.

Making Meaning
Throughout the past 10 years, I have become increasingly interested in the relationship between feeling, form and most recently, in the Aristotelian notion of Necessity. During my last process (Gutter Gate, 2011) this notion of necessity came to the forefront of the work as I began to wonder how abstraction could be necessary. What is necessary about shape, color or line and how can we define what “happens” throughout the course of a piece without being able to locate the “defining event?” I became disinterested in describing the narrative as non-linear. I felt like I was poaching this term from an historical and theoretical languaging tradition which said very little about my work and the kind of narrative I was interested in pursuing. Structurally, Gutter Gate (our last piece) dealt in a series of chaotic groupings that referenced certain interpersonal conflicts and milestones but never claimed them. It was a challenge to extend beyond and develop these “meaning” moments and not rest on the thorny defense that it’s “non-linear.”

We were also developing a rigorous movement language which kept pointing to a specific kind of time, a thinking kind of time. To generate material, we located the genitals, lower intestines and the heart and began practicing a series of Body Mind Centering exercises that focused on moving from these singular places. We also located skin and bone as vibrant and critical initiating points for the movement and I noticed how muscle and bone also seemed to cantilever off of these organs. It was about showing the body working hard, working something out on stage. You could see the body and the mind strategizing. A more intentional kind of time feels like you can see me, the maker, working. The viewer is able to see the necessity in the timing because the action of learning is related to a task. The “doing” or learning body replaces the performing body.

Treading between a cooler aesthetic and a hotter emotional inclination, my thinking about content has shifted for the new group work I am researching. How do I locate the “event” or cause of a particular dramatic action without falling into a kind of reasonable logic that will negate the structural risks I want to take? Instead, I want these “conceptual” or more emotionally resonant moments to shift the work structurally. Making it less about what the content is, and more about how its timbre can impact the formal logic of the work. I want the compositional integrity to be mapped by an abstract understanding of content and its ability to willfully attend to structure and resist being taken over by its conceptual or more “meaningful” tendencies. The “event” or defining moment, that some might read as content will be used as a tool or texture rather than defining narrative hook of the work.

Is this just a slipperiness on my part not to claim the content or “it” of the work? I am also curious about the whys and whats to sticking by the form and how that is in some ways also thorny. That self consciousness almost makes me want to curtail meaning and employ abstraction for loss of control or moreover to avoid interpretation. Hasn’t that been the role of post modernism over the last fifty years anyway? To say that the distinction between form and content is an illusion?

–Juliana May, Movement Research 2011 Artist in Residence

Gutter Gate excerpt

Scholar’s Corner: POLITICS OF PIETY

As a doctoral student at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, I am currently preparing to take the long-awaited “Second Examination” in August. This consists of a rigorous set of written and oral exams on three scholarly fields that I myself have defined. In this way it is unlike the much broader “First Examination,” which covered all of theatre history and theory in the widest possible scope.

My three fields are as follows:

1) “Approaches to Embodied Practice” (30 books)

2) “Actor Training in the U.S. since 1930” (25 books)

3) “Affect, Politics, and Performance” (25 books)

With the idea that these topics could be of interest to the Movement Research community, I will be posting brief discussions of some of my favorite books here throughout the month of July. Each of the books I will address was published in the past ten years, and each is excellent overall. They are all scholarly works, although some are more accessible in tone and language than others. I hope that these blog entries will point theory-minded practitioners towards some new ideas in emerging scholarship — and perhaps tempt some scholars to the website of Movement Research.

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The Week Ahead. July 4-10, 2011.

jon-kinzel
This Week at Movement Research…

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