Posts Tagged ‘Rosalind Masson’

My body now and then

This is probably the most personal blog I’ve written so far and I can tell you I’m really enjoying the process of blogging. I’m sure the sporadic nature of my life right now reflects in the spectrum of Blogs I have made. I used to be scared by this inconsistency. By feeling a lack of patterning or tangible patterning in my schedule. I wonder to what extent the patterns in my body, in my habitual movements extend into the way I structure my life? I wonder if my choices or should I say options are a direct result of the way I hold myself, the way I walk, the way I talk to people and how I perceive what is around me?As my movement patterns change through my practice, as they shift like sand I wonder where the ground is beneath me. Where is my reality at? WHAT lens am I looking through?I like working in dance because it’s tangible. When so many other things around me are fluctuating I can sense with my body the changes day by day and not be afraid of them.

I hope to continue this practice for many many more years to come.

Thank you Movement Research for making a space for this experience in our lives.

Rosalind Masson (former MR Intern)

New Europe

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/mar/16/new-europe-germany-culture-art-classical-music?intcmp=122

Rosalind (former MR Intern)

Talking with Hanna Hegenscheidt

Today I had a great conversation with Hanna Hegenscheidt a choreographer and teacher of Klein Technique based in Berlin. She was one of the first group of students to complete teacher training in Klein technique. She moved to New York in 1992 and a part from a short break when she came back to Germany, studied with Barbara and Susan for seven years before becoming certified in 2000. She then stayed in New York for a further four years teaching and performing before moving back to Berlin where she is now based.

I first saw Hanna’s choreographic work in September. Her piece ‘Bitte streicheln Sie hier’ – ‘Please stroke here’, worked with ideas of disconnection through the use of text, sound, lighting and body and focused on the relationship between a man and woman. Hanna works with actors and well as dancers and sees herself as a director more than a choreographer. She says that Klein technique changed the way she watched dance, how she moved and gave directions. ‘It allows the body to work from a more connected place but has larger implications of how we perceive and therefore create work’. Hanna’s practice in Klein is so integrated that it’s become part of how she sees. She says in the simplicity of Klein there is complexity. Her own choreographic work is highly complex and yet allows us to see the simplest of human relations making it very satisfying. This re-asserts my belief in depth of research leading to highly engaging yet accessible work.

When she first moved to Berlin, Klein technique wasn’t so well known and it took her a few years establish a larger base of students for the work. Walking into Labor Gras today I see a studio full of early morning students. Over twenty people! Though she says an average number is more like 11. Considering Berlin is such a late night city it says a lot of the work and Hanna’s teaching that so many folk gather. I ask her how many of her students are dancers and she tells me that most of them dance but aren’t necessarily ‘professionals’, whatever that means. There are also people studying dance theory and dance science as well as actors, musicians and an opera singer. She says it’s nice to have students that really apply themselves – for example some choreographers who might come for a week long intensive and then come back again in a few months after Read the rest of this entry »

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